Invited Artist

Gerard Marcus
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I have shown my work in many exhibitions in New York, nationally and internationally including, The National Academy of Design; The Hollar Society, Prague; The International Print Center New York; The Susan Teller Gallery, New York; Iowa State University; The Lancaster Museum, Lancaster, PA; The City University of New York; The Trenton City Museum; The Municipal Art Gallery, Los Angeles, CA; The Morris Museum, Morristown, NJ; and Smith College.  I am a former president of the Society of American Graphic Artists.  I live and work in New York City

 

My prints are nature based, often begun on site and then worked up in the studio. I try to combine the spontaneity of a quick drawing with the strength of a carefully conceived composition to create images rich in tone and texture.

 

Gerald Marcus

gerald.r.marcus@gmail.com

My prints are nature based, often begun on site and then worked up in the studio. I try to combine the spontaneity of a quick drawing with the strength of a carefully conceived composition to create images rich in tone and texture.

 

Gerald Marcus

gerald.r.marcus@gmail.com

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I have shown my work in many exhibitions in New York, nationally and internationally including, The National Academy of Design; The Hollar Society, Prague; The International Print Center New York; The Susan Teller Gallery, New York; Iowa State University; The Lancaster Museum, Lancaster, PA; The City University of New York; The Trenton City Museum; The Municipal Art Gallery, Los Angeles, CA; The Morris Museum, Morristown, NJ; and Smith College.  I am a former president of the Society of American Graphic Artists.  I live and work in New York City

 

My prints are nature based, often begun on site and then worked up in the studio. I try to combine the spontaneity of a quick drawing with the strength of a carefully conceived composition to create images rich in tone and texture.

 

Gerald Marcus

gerald.r.marcus@gmail.com

Babette Katz
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I am a relief printmaker and book artist.  I like the simplicity of the materials I use —- carving tools, rollers, oil-based ink, and the back of a rubbing spoon.  Place a fine piece of rice paper on top of the inked carved surface of linoleum or wood, rub it with the back of a rubbing spoon and come up with a fully realized dramatic image.  This is a hand-pulled relief print.  Its power is enhanced by the use of black ink alone on white paper.  Many of my prints are narrative and character driven.  Black ink, white paper, and pared down linoleum or wood must carry the burden of proof.

 

“Black and white derives its source from the deepest recesses of our very being.”  So said Odilon Redon.

 

Max Klinger has said that “ the graphic mediums in black and white offer the

best way to communicate a fantasy vision of another world, or a deeply subjective and critical view of our own.”

 

These words carry strong resonance for me.

 

My prints can be found in the collections of the Corcoran Gallery, the Print Club of Albany, the Museum of the City of New York, and the Billie Rose Theater Collection at the New York Public Library.  Artist’s books are in the Special Collections Libraries of the Metropolitan Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, the Tate Library, Victoria & Albert Museum, Yale and Harvard.

I am a relief printmaker and book artist.  I like the simplicity of the materials I use —- carving tools, rollers, oil-based ink, and the back of a rubbing spoon.  Place a fine piece of rice paper on top of the inked carved surface of linoleum or wood, rub it with the back of a rubbing spoon and come up with a fully realized dramatic image.  This is a hand-pulled relief print.  Its power is enhanced by the use of black ink alone on white paper.  Many of my prints are narrative and character driven.  Black ink, white paper, and pared down linoleum or wood must carry the burden of proof.

x

I am a relief printmaker and book artist.  I like the simplicity of the materials I use —- carving tools, rollers, oil-based ink, and the back of a rubbing spoon.  Place a fine piece of rice paper on top of the inked carved surface of linoleum or wood, rub it with the back of a rubbing spoon and come up with a fully realized dramatic image.  This is a hand-pulled relief print.  Its power is enhanced by the use of black ink alone on white paper.  Many of my prints are narrative and character driven.  Black ink, white paper, and pared down linoleum or wood must carry the burden of proof.

 

“Black and white derives its source from the deepest recesses of our very being.”  So said Odilon Redon.

 

Max Klinger has said that “ the graphic mediums in black and white offer the

best way to communicate a fantasy vision of another world, or a deeply subjective and critical view of our own.”

 

These words carry strong resonance for me.

 

My prints can be found in the collections of the Corcoran Gallery, the Print Club of Albany, the Museum of the City of New York, and the Billie Rose Theater Collection at the New York Public Library.  Artist’s books are in the Special Collections Libraries of the Metropolitan Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, the Tate Library, Victoria & Albert Museum, Yale and Harvard.

Harvey Breverman
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"In the lithographic work such as Disputation, 1971, the spontaneity of drawing on the stone is reinforced by the image itself.  The space is important though the low horizon line gives a simple content and we can tell by this dance the facial expressions and open-hearted appeal that is a figure in the act of discussing." -- from his book, Harvey Breverman, Humanist Impulses.  He is the SUNY Distinguished Professor of Art at the university in Buffalo, NY.

"In 1970, Breverman begins making lithographs at Impressions Workshop in Boston where he continued to work for the next 17 years." -- from his book, Harvey Breverman, Humanist Impulses.

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"In the lithographic work such as Disputation, 1971, the spontaneity of drawing on the stone is reinforced by the image itself.  The space is important though the low horizon line gives a simple content and we can tell by this dance the facial expressions and open-hearted appeal that is a figure in the act of discussing." -- from his book, Harvey Breverman, Humanist Impulses.  He is the SUNY Distinguished Professor of Art at the university in Buffalo, NY.

Carol Wax
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Carol Wax originally trained to be a classical musician at the Manhattan School of Music but abandoned her music career when she fell in love with printmaking. Soon after she began engraving mezzotints, renowned print dealer Sylvan Cole invited her to exhibit at Associated American Artists Gallery, launching her career as a professional artist/printmaker. With the publication of her book, The Mezzotint: History and Technique, published by Abrams, 1990 and 1996, Carol added author and teacher to her credits. In the ensuing years she has expanded her repertoire of mediums beyond printmaking into other works on paper and painting.

Recognition of Carol's art includes an Individual Support Grant from the Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation, Inc., two Artist Fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, a Concordia Career Advancement Award from NYFA, The Louise Nevelson Award for Excellence in Printmaking from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and residences at The MacDowell Colony and Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation's Space Program.  A selection of the many collections that own her prints are The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The New York and Boston Public Libraries, The Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Library of Congress, and The National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

My imagery is inspired by the humor and humanity I see in the designs of industrial relics. Hands that manufactured and used abandoned toys, vintage textiles, and outdated technology speak to me across time. By resurrecting and reinterpreting utilitarian objects in contemporary contexts, I explore our underlying relationships with the material things we create, consume, and cast away.

x

Carol Wax originally trained to be a classical musician at the Manhattan School of Music but abandoned her music career when she fell in love with printmaking. Soon after she began engraving mezzotints, renowned print dealer Sylvan Cole invited her to exhibit at Associated American Artists Gallery, launching her career as a professional artist/printmaker. With the publication of her book, The Mezzotint: History and Technique, published by Abrams, 1990 and 1996, Carol added author and teacher to her credits. In the ensuing years she has expanded her repertoire of mediums beyond printmaking into other works on paper and painting.

Recognition of Carol's art includes an Individual Support Grant from the Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation, Inc., two Artist Fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, a Concordia Career Advancement Award from NYFA, The Louise Nevelson Award for Excellence in Printmaking from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and residences at The MacDowell Colony and Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation's Space Program.  A selection of the many collections that own her prints are The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The New York and Boston Public Libraries, The Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Library of Congress, and The National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Eric Goldberg
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Drawing is the medium in which my image making begins and through which it evolves. Whether the source of the work is from direct observation, a photo I have taken or from my imagination, it is always initially expressed as a drawing. Ultimately, the work may become an etching or a painting, but at its core is always drawing. Drawing has a tactile directness that connects the mind and the hand. It is a two-way connection where the drawing evokes thought and thought evokes drawing. An unintentional gesture of the hand can change the concept in a direction that the mind alone would not have traveled.

 

Etching on a copper plate is, by its very nature, a process with many steps from its beginning through its completion. It is a process that is well suited to my way of working. I am able to develop a drawing that evolves as it develops.  Values and forms, must be decided, resolved and executed during the drawing. Patterns, made from lines, cross lines and stipples become spontaneously obvious to me while I work. Patterns and values can be built and enhanced by the layering of successive etches. When the plate is inked and printed, the inverted image becomes an entity onto itself; the whole greater than the sum of its parts.

Drawing is the medium in which my image making begins and through which it evolves. Whether the source of the work is from direct observation, a photo I have taken or from my imagination, it is always initially expressed as a drawing. Ultimately, the work may become an etching or a painting, but at its core is always drawing. Drawing has a tactile directness that connects the mind and the hand. It is a two-way connection where the drawing evokes thought and thought evokes drawing. An unintentional gesture of the hand can change the concept in a direction that the mind alone would not have traveled.

 

x

Drawing is the medium in which my image making begins and through which it evolves. Whether the source of the work is from direct observation, a photo I have taken or from my imagination, it is always initially expressed as a drawing. Ultimately, the work may become an etching or a painting, but at its core is always drawing. Drawing has a tactile directness that connects the mind and the hand. It is a two-way connection where the drawing evokes thought and thought evokes drawing. An unintentional gesture of the hand can change the concept in a direction that the mind alone would not have traveled.

 

Etching on a copper plate is, by its very nature, a process with many steps from its beginning through its completion. It is a process that is well suited to my way of working. I am able to develop a drawing that evolves as it develops.  Values and forms, must be decided, resolved and executed during the drawing. Patterns, made from lines, cross lines and stipples become spontaneously obvious to me while I work. Patterns and values can be built and enhanced by the layering of successive etches. When the plate is inked and printed, the inverted image becomes an entity onto itself; the whole greater than the sum of its parts.

Leonard Leibowitz
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Forest Hills, NY

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Karen Whitman
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ARTISTS STATEMENT 

IDAHERMA FOUNDATION

 

 

 

   My studio is in Woodstock, New York, and my linocuts are inspired by New York City, in which I lived for eighteen years, and to which I have been closely connected all my life. My subjects explore the vibrant life of the city with its dense and diverse architecture. People interact with their complex environments to create a world and tell a story, as I weave their energetic elements with contrasting patterns and textures. The eye is led from one vignette to another, each telling its own tale of the urban experience. In so doing, I aim to portray the city as positive, accessible, and beautiful, even playful; and yet, inadvertently, I seem to convey a sense of mystery, making it a challenge to differentiate between whimsy and foreboding. The city is all of these things simultaneously, which is why it inspires me and is the primary subject of my work.

 

 

   My prints, characterized by this narrative quality, capture a moment that appears to be part of a longer story, and I encourage the viewer to complete. What lurks around the next corner, or behind that building? Sometimes, the buildings are the main characters, which I strive to imbue with as much personality as those of the two and four legged creatures that populate many of my images. Whether an individual or architecture is the focus of the scene, the viewer is invited to participate in and invent the story that is suggested by or encapsulated in that single, albeit timeless moment.

 

 

   Linocuts do justice to the graphic quality of the city, with its hard edged and angular forms. I have a special affinity with black and white imagery, which emphasizes and is in character with the dramatic contrasts of city life. I especially enjoy the challenges of creating art using extreme light, dark and texture to bring an image to life and to make a direct impact without the dazzle of color. I also enjoy the physicality of the carving process and turning what is actually a relief sculpture into a two-dimensional work of art, reminding me daily of the hard work and patience it takes to accomplish most anything meaningful. I share my excitement with the medium with students at a black and white linocut workshops I teach at The Woodstock School of art, helping to keep a hand executed art form alive in an increasingly digital world.

Bearsville, NY
   My studio is in Woodstock, New York, and my linocuts are inspired by New York City, in which I lived for eighteen years, and to which I have been closely connected all my life. My subjects explore the vibrant life of the city with its dense and diverse architecture. People interact with their complex environments to create a world and tell a story, as I weave their energetic elements with contrasting patterns and textures. The eye is led from one vignette to another, each telling its own tale of the urban experience. In so doing, I aim to portray the city as positive, accessible, and beautiful, even playful; and yet, inadvertently, I seem to convey a sense of mystery, making it a challenge to differentiate between whimsy and foreboding. The city is all of these things simultaneously, which is why it inspires me and is the primary subject of my work.

x

ARTISTS STATEMENT 

IDAHERMA FOUNDATION

 

 

 

   My studio is in Woodstock, New York, and my linocuts are inspired by New York City, in which I lived for eighteen years, and to which I have been closely connected all my life. My subjects explore the vibrant life of the city with its dense and diverse architecture. People interact with their complex environments to create a world and tell a story, as I weave their energetic elements with contrasting patterns and textures. The eye is led from one vignette to another, each telling its own tale of the urban experience. In so doing, I aim to portray the city as positive, accessible, and beautiful, even playful; and yet, inadvertently, I seem to convey a sense of mystery, making it a challenge to differentiate between whimsy and foreboding. The city is all of these things simultaneously, which is why it inspires me and is the primary subject of my work.

 

 

   My prints, characterized by this narrative quality, capture a moment that appears to be part of a longer story, and I encourage the viewer to complete. What lurks around the next corner, or behind that building? Sometimes, the buildings are the main characters, which I strive to imbue with as much personality as those of the two and four legged creatures that populate many of my images. Whether an individual or architecture is the focus of the scene, the viewer is invited to participate in and invent the story that is suggested by or encapsulated in that single, albeit timeless moment.

 

 

   Linocuts do justice to the graphic quality of the city, with its hard edged and angular forms. I have a special affinity with black and white imagery, which emphasizes and is in character with the dramatic contrasts of city life. I especially enjoy the challenges of creating art using extreme light, dark and texture to bring an image to life and to make a direct impact without the dazzle of color. I also enjoy the physicality of the carving process and turning what is actually a relief sculpture into a two-dimensional work of art, reminding me daily of the hard work and patience it takes to accomplish most anything meaningful. I share my excitement with the medium with students at a black and white linocut workshops I teach at The Woodstock School of art, helping to keep a hand executed art form alive in an increasingly digital world.

Grace Bentley-Scheck
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Sassafras Press
 

gbentleyscheck@verizon.net

The philosopher, Gaston Bachelard, said that buildings reverberate through time. Architecture, created by humans, is caught in the human cycle of birth, decay, death, and regeneration. Some buildings, like the Old State House in Boston, become stages for momentous events. Later generations seek to experience these sites of cultural seachanges. Other buildings shelter ordinary family or business activities and slowly adapt to social change and the natural aging process. In urban centers, such buildings often grow out of the debris of earlier cultures or stand next to buildings preserved from an earlier time. When the bulldozer breaks the ground of a city lot, it opens it to the future while excavating the past. For better or worse, structures relate to each other, and urban spaces evolve in an organic manner.

For many years, my works have dealt with architecture as space humans enclose which becomes dynamic via its passage through time. The process of building a collagraph plate layer by layer and the marks that result from the printing process provide an evocative medium for expressing the geometry of the urban space, its existence in the chronological passage of time, and the layers of human experience contained within the building. Through relationships of buildings and the activities that take place in and around them, architecture becomes a metaphor for the larger society.

My prints are collagraphs with silk aquatint. I begin by making a drawing on tracing paper. I flip the drawing to allow for the reversal from plate to print, and I trace shapes in the drawing onto paper. The plates are collages of paper shapes layered on a substrate, usually masonite or museum board, with silk organza adhered over the paper bas relief. The edges of the shapes in the paper bas relief define the images such as buildings and result in embossment in the print. I paint areas of the organza numerous times with acrylic gloss medium to achieve a range of values from black to white. When this part of the process is finished, I may create textural effects in some areas of the plate. There are many options. Found materials may be adhered to the plate or inlaid in modeling paste. Modeling paste may be applied and textured with a variety of tools. Sometimes, I mix modeling paste with gloss medium and paint it over a penciled design. I use both intaglio and relief techniques when printing, and I print on rag paper in an etching press.

Education: BFA and MFA, New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University

Selected International Exhibitions:

  • 2018 – Best in Show, Art League of Rhode Island Members show at Warwick Center for Arts
  • 2015 - The Future: LAPS International Print Exhibition at Scuola Internazionale di Grafica Gallery, Venice, Italy
  • 2011 – New Prints 2011/Autumn at International Print center New York
  • 2011 – Bradley International Print and Drawing Exhibition, Peoria, Ill.
  • 2010 – New Prints 2010 / Spring at International Print Center New York
  • 2007 - HAND-PULLED PRINTS INTERNATIONAL XIII, StoneMetal Press Center, Tx.
  • 2006 – NY – PRAHA, SAGA Exhibition in Prague, Hollar Society Gallery, Czech Republic
  • 2006 – The Old Print Shop at Graphic Studio, Dublin, Ireland
  • 2000 - International Print Triennial-Cracow 2000, Bridge to the Future
  • 2000 - International Print Triennial, Cracow-Nurnberg, Germany
  • 1995 - International Print Triennial ’94 Consumenta ’95,Nurnberg, Germany
  • 1995 - Graphic Constellation, Graz, Austria; Cultural City Network
  • 1994 - International Print Triennial-Cracow

One and Two Person Exhibitions:

  • 2016 – Light, Shadow, and Time, The Old Print Gallery, Washington, DC
  • 2014 – Look Again, Duxbury Art Complex, Ma.
  • 2014 – Proof Positive: An Exhibition of Work by the Printmakers Network of Southern New England at the Slater Memorial Museum, Norwich, Ct.
  • 2014 – Society of American Graphic Artists 81st Members Exhibition at The Old Print Shop, NY,NY
  • 2014 – Palate to Plate, With Boston Printmakers members at Newport Art Museum, RI
  • 2012 – 79th Members Exhibition of Society of American Graphic Artists at The Old Print Shop, NYC
  • 2011 - Micro/Macro with Print Network of Southern New England at Newport Art Museum, RI
  • 2011 –Travel (collaborative artists’ book) included in Turning the Page: The Evolution of Artists’ Books, Beard and Weil Galleries, Watson Fine Arts, Wheaton College, Norton, Ma.
  • 2009 – Los Angeles Printmaking Society 20th National Exhibition, LA Municipal Art Gallery, Ca.

Selected Awards:

  • 2018 – Best in Show – Art League Rhode Island 2018 Members Annual Exh., Warwick Center for the Arts
  • 2015 – A.I.Friedman Materials Award, Society of American Graphic Artists Centennial National Exhibition at the Art Students League of NY, NY
  • 2013 – Honorable Mention, American Color Print Society Spring Exhibition
  • 2009 - The Stella Drabkin Memorial Award, American Color Print Society 70th Members Exh.
  • 2009 – First prize Watermark ’09-National Juried Exhibition, NC
  • 2006 - Juror’s award,25th National Print Exhibition, Silvermine Guild Galleries, Ct

Collections:

  • Knoxville Museum of Art, Tennessee
  • Portland Art Museum, Oregon
  • Newport Art Museum, RI
  • University of South Dakota, Vermillion
  • Silvermine Guild of Artists, New Canaan, Ct.
  • Trenton State College, NJ Trenton
  • Microsoft
  • Bridgewater State College,
  • Hobart and William Smith Colleges
  • Wheaton College

Experience:

  • 2015 – Elected Print Club of Rochester’s 2016 Presentation Print Artist
  • 2012-2014 -teught collagraph printing at Coleman Center for Creative Studies, Newport Art Mus.
  • 2012 – Taught collagraph workshop at University of Rhode Island
  • 2009 – Created an image for Travel, an artists’ book resulting from a collaboration between members of Print Network of Southern New England and three poets
  • 2009 – Visiting Artist, Colby College, Waterville, Maine

Sassafras Press
 

My prints are collagraphs with silk aquatint. I begin by making a drawing on tracing paper.

I flip the drawing to allow for the reversal from plate to print, and I trace shapes in the drawing onto paper.

The plates are collages of paper shapes layered on a substrate, usually masonite or museum board, with silk organza adhered over the paper bas relief.

x

Sassafras Press
 

gbentleyscheck@verizon.net

The philosopher, Gaston Bachelard, said that buildings reverberate through time. Architecture, created by humans, is caught in the human cycle of birth, decay, death, and regeneration. Some buildings, like the Old State House in Boston, become stages for momentous events. Later generations seek to experience these sites of cultural seachanges. Other buildings shelter ordinary family or business activities and slowly adapt to social change and the natural aging process. In urban centers, such buildings often grow out of the debris of earlier cultures or stand next to buildings preserved from an earlier time. When the bulldozer breaks the ground of a city lot, it opens it to the future while excavating the past. For better or worse, structures relate to each other, and urban spaces evolve in an organic manner.

For many years, my works have dealt with architecture as space humans enclose which becomes dynamic via its passage through time. The process of building a collagraph plate layer by layer and the marks that result from the printing process provide an evocative medium for expressing the geometry of the urban space, its existence in the chronological passage of time, and the layers of human experience contained within the building. Through relationships of buildings and the activities that take place in and around them, architecture becomes a metaphor for the larger society.

My prints are collagraphs with silk aquatint. I begin by making a drawing on tracing paper. I flip the drawing to allow for the reversal from plate to print, and I trace shapes in the drawing onto paper. The plates are collages of paper shapes layered on a substrate, usually masonite or museum board, with silk organza adhered over the paper bas relief. The edges of the shapes in the paper bas relief define the images such as buildings and result in embossment in the print. I paint areas of the organza numerous times with acrylic gloss medium to achieve a range of values from black to white. When this part of the process is finished, I may create textural effects in some areas of the plate. There are many options. Found materials may be adhered to the plate or inlaid in modeling paste. Modeling paste may be applied and textured with a variety of tools. Sometimes, I mix modeling paste with gloss medium and paint it over a penciled design. I use both intaglio and relief techniques when printing, and I print on rag paper in an etching press.

Education: BFA and MFA, New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University

Selected International Exhibitions:

  • 2018 – Best in Show, Art League of Rhode Island Members show at Warwick Center for Arts
  • 2015 - The Future: LAPS International Print Exhibition at Scuola Internazionale di Grafica Gallery, Venice, Italy
  • 2011 – New Prints 2011/Autumn at International Print center New York
  • 2011 – Bradley International Print and Drawing Exhibition, Peoria, Ill.
  • 2010 – New Prints 2010 / Spring at International Print Center New York
  • 2007 - HAND-PULLED PRINTS INTERNATIONAL XIII, StoneMetal Press Center, Tx.
  • 2006 – NY – PRAHA, SAGA Exhibition in Prague, Hollar Society Gallery, Czech Republic
  • 2006 – The Old Print Shop at Graphic Studio, Dublin, Ireland
  • 2000 - International Print Triennial-Cracow 2000, Bridge to the Future
  • 2000 - International Print Triennial, Cracow-Nurnberg, Germany
  • 1995 - International Print Triennial ’94 Consumenta ’95,Nurnberg, Germany
  • 1995 - Graphic Constellation, Graz, Austria; Cultural City Network
  • 1994 - International Print Triennial-Cracow

One and Two Person Exhibitions:

  • 2016 – Light, Shadow, and Time, The Old Print Gallery, Washington, DC
  • 2014 – Look Again, Duxbury Art Complex, Ma.
  • 2014 – Proof Positive: An Exhibition of Work by the Printmakers Network of Southern New England at the Slater Memorial Museum, Norwich, Ct.
  • 2014 – Society of American Graphic Artists 81st Members Exhibition at The Old Print Shop, NY,NY
  • 2014 – Palate to Plate, With Boston Printmakers members at Newport Art Museum, RI
  • 2012 – 79th Members Exhibition of Society of American Graphic Artists at The Old Print Shop, NYC
  • 2011 - Micro/Macro with Print Network of Southern New England at Newport Art Museum, RI
  • 2011 –Travel (collaborative artists’ book) included in Turning the Page: The Evolution of Artists’ Books, Beard and Weil Galleries, Watson Fine Arts, Wheaton College, Norton, Ma.
  • 2009 – Los Angeles Printmaking Society 20th National Exhibition, LA Municipal Art Gallery, Ca.

Selected Awards:

  • 2018 – Best in Show – Art League Rhode Island 2018 Members Annual Exh., Warwick Center for the Arts
  • 2015 – A.I.Friedman Materials Award, Society of American Graphic Artists Centennial National Exhibition at the Art Students League of NY, NY
  • 2013 – Honorable Mention, American Color Print Society Spring Exhibition
  • 2009 - The Stella Drabkin Memorial Award, American Color Print Society 70th Members Exh.
  • 2009 – First prize Watermark ’09-National Juried Exhibition, NC
  • 2006 - Juror’s award,25th National Print Exhibition, Silvermine Guild Galleries, Ct

Collections:

  • Knoxville Museum of Art, Tennessee
  • Portland Art Museum, Oregon
  • Newport Art Museum, RI
  • University of South Dakota, Vermillion
  • Silvermine Guild of Artists, New Canaan, Ct.
  • Trenton State College, NJ Trenton
  • Microsoft
  • Bridgewater State College,
  • Hobart and William Smith Colleges
  • Wheaton College

Experience:

  • 2015 – Elected Print Club of Rochester’s 2016 Presentation Print Artist
  • 2012-2014 -teught collagraph printing at Coleman Center for Creative Studies, Newport Art Mus.
  • 2012 – Taught collagraph workshop at University of Rhode Island
  • 2009 – Created an image for Travel, an artists’ book resulting from a collaboration between members of Print Network of Southern New England and three poets
  • 2009 – Visiting Artist, Colby College, Waterville, Maine
Evan Lindquist
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Biography

Born 1936, Salina, Kansas. Grew up in Solomon, Kansas; Odessa, Missouri; and Emporia, Kansas.

1958, married artist Sharon Lindquist. Two sons.

1950-1960: Self-employed as calligrapher - engrosser. Commissioned by national Alpha Kappa Lambda fraternity, charters and certificates for national distribution. 1954-1958: Art and Biology, Emporia State University; Bachelor of Science in Education with honors, 1958. 1958-1960: Staff Artist, Emporia State University. 1960-1963: Printmaking, University of Iowa with Mauricio Lasansky. Master of Fine Arts in Printmaking, 1963. 1963-2003: Professor of Art, Arkansas State University - Jonesboro, forty years teaching Printmaking and Drawing. 2003-present: Artist-Printmaker in private studio, Jonesboro. Selected Honors 2003: Distinguished Emeritus Professor of Art, Arkansas State University. 2013: First Artist Laureate for State of Arkansas, Act of Legislature and Gov. Mike Beebe. 2010: Lifetime Achievement Award, Society of American Graphic Artists (SAGA), NYC. 2010: Centennial list, 100 Most Distinguished Faculty Members from 1909 to 2009, Arkansas State University 2004: Governor’s Lifetime Achievement Award, Arkansas Arts Council and Governor of The State of Arkansas. 2004: Distinguished Alumni Award, Emporia State University 1981: Outstanding Faculty Member, Arkansas State University 1981: First Chairman of the President’s Fellows, Arkansas State University More than 60 solo exhibitions.

More than 80 awards in over 300 competitive exhibitions.

Selected public collections

  • Albertina, Vienna;
  • Art Institute of Chicago;
  • Baltimore Museum of Art;
  • Boston Museum of Fine Arts;
  • Bradbury Art Museum, Jonesboro;
  • Columbia University Libraries, NYC;
  • Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane;
  • Portland Art Museum, Oregon;
  • Syracuse University Art Galleries;
  • Uffizi, Florence, Italy;
  • Whitney Museum of American Art, NYC

Artist’s Statement, April 2018

Since 1955, my preferred medium for printmaking has been Burin Engraving.

Beginning as a calligrapher and engrosser in my youth, my interest was eventually drawn to the process of Burin Engraving as a medium for printmaking.

Since the 15th century, prints by old master engravers, such as Jean Duvet, Albrecht Dürer, Martin Schöngauer, and many others, provided exciting historical context to the process of Engraving, making it a fascinating area of research. I have studied the prints of hundreds of old master engravers while trying to learn their secrets, and I am still learning from them. Their choices and careers were not always perfect, but I learn from their mistakes as well as successes.

Today, unfortunately, there are many important engravers, including great and talented women in printmaking whose names are barely remembered after hundreds of years. Diana Scultori and Magdalena van de Passe are two very early examples of great women engravers.

The old master engravers who were celebrated in past centuries blazed trails for us to follow in our goal of becoming modern printmakers. Why have modern printmakers and historians so often failed to celebrate those great old masters? We owe much to them.

My current goal is to make more old master printmakers visible to today’s printmakers.

Submitted works

Catalog #335.
Title: Jean Duvet Engraves an Apocalypse.
Medium: Burin engraving.
Year: 2017.
Edition size: 25.
Image size: 10 x 11.7 inches.
Mat size (suggested): 18 x 19 inches.
Price: $400 (without mat or frame).

Catalog #316.
Title: My Thoughts.
Medium: Burin engraving.
Year: 2016.
Edition size: 25.
Image size: 10 x 12.8 inches.
Mat size (suggested): 16 x 19 inches.
Price: $400 (without mat or frame).

www.evanlindquist.com

Jonesboro, Arkansas

Since 1955, my preferred medium for printmaking has been Burin Engraving.

Beginning as a calligrapher and engrosser in my youth, my interest was eventually draw to the process of Burin Engraving as a medium for printmaking.

x

Biography

Born 1936, Salina, Kansas. Grew up in Solomon, Kansas; Odessa, Missouri; and Emporia, Kansas.

1958, married artist Sharon Lindquist. Two sons.

1950-1960: Self-employed as calligrapher - engrosser. Commissioned by national Alpha Kappa Lambda fraternity, charters and certificates for national distribution. 1954-1958: Art and Biology, Emporia State University; Bachelor of Science in Education with honors, 1958. 1958-1960: Staff Artist, Emporia State University. 1960-1963: Printmaking, University of Iowa with Mauricio Lasansky. Master of Fine Arts in Printmaking, 1963. 1963-2003: Professor of Art, Arkansas State University - Jonesboro, forty years teaching Printmaking and Drawing. 2003-present: Artist-Printmaker in private studio, Jonesboro. Selected Honors 2003: Distinguished Emeritus Professor of Art, Arkansas State University. 2013: First Artist Laureate for State of Arkansas, Act of Legislature and Gov. Mike Beebe. 2010: Lifetime Achievement Award, Society of American Graphic Artists (SAGA), NYC. 2010: Centennial list, 100 Most Distinguished Faculty Members from 1909 to 2009, Arkansas State University 2004: Governor’s Lifetime Achievement Award, Arkansas Arts Council and Governor of The State of Arkansas. 2004: Distinguished Alumni Award, Emporia State University 1981: Outstanding Faculty Member, Arkansas State University 1981: First Chairman of the President’s Fellows, Arkansas State University More than 60 solo exhibitions.

More than 80 awards in over 300 competitive exhibitions.

Selected public collections

  • Albertina, Vienna;
  • Art Institute of Chicago;
  • Baltimore Museum of Art;
  • Boston Museum of Fine Arts;
  • Bradbury Art Museum, Jonesboro;
  • Columbia University Libraries, NYC;
  • Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane;
  • Portland Art Museum, Oregon;
  • Syracuse University Art Galleries;
  • Uffizi, Florence, Italy;
  • Whitney Museum of American Art, NYC

Artist’s Statement, April 2018

Since 1955, my preferred medium for printmaking has been Burin Engraving.

Beginning as a calligrapher and engrosser in my youth, my interest was eventually drawn to the process of Burin Engraving as a medium for printmaking.

Since the 15th century, prints by old master engravers, such as Jean Duvet, Albrecht Dürer, Martin Schöngauer, and many others, provided exciting historical context to the process of Engraving, making it a fascinating area of research. I have studied the prints of hundreds of old master engravers while trying to learn their secrets, and I am still learning from them. Their choices and careers were not always perfect, but I learn from their mistakes as well as successes.

Today, unfortunately, there are many important engravers, including great and talented women in printmaking whose names are barely remembered after hundreds of years. Diana Scultori and Magdalena van de Passe are two very early examples of great women engravers.

The old master engravers who were celebrated in past centuries blazed trails for us to follow in our goal of becoming modern printmakers. Why have modern printmakers and historians so often failed to celebrate those great old masters? We owe much to them.

My current goal is to make more old master printmakers visible to today’s printmakers.

Submitted works

Catalog #335.
Title: Jean Duvet Engraves an Apocalypse.
Medium: Burin engraving.
Year: 2017.
Edition size: 25.
Image size: 10 x 11.7 inches.
Mat size (suggested): 18 x 19 inches.
Price: $400 (without mat or frame).

Catalog #316.
Title: My Thoughts.
Medium: Burin engraving.
Year: 2016.
Edition size: 25.
Image size: 10 x 12.8 inches.
Mat size (suggested): 16 x 19 inches.
Price: $400 (without mat or frame).

Carol Strause FitzSimonds
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List of Artwork jpegs:

  1. ARTiculation, Coptic Artist Book with clamshell box, aquatints with embossing and chine colle’, 2018
  2. ARTiculation texture, Concertina Artist Book with clamshell box, collagraphs, 2018
  3. ARTiculation shape, Accordion Artist Book with clamshell box, aquatints with embossing and chine colle’, 2018
  4. Floral Patterns, Star Accordion Artist Book, mixed media drypoint, 2017
  5. Head in the Clouds, Coptic Artist Book, Aquatint, 2017
www.csfitzsimonds.com

fitzsimjc@cox.net

Printmaker, Book Artist, Instructor and former commercial Gallery Curator, Carol has exhibited her work at colleges, museums, and galleries across the United States and abroad. A graduate of Hollins College with a degree in Art, she has continued study with classes/workshops from Olympc College (WA), Art League School (VA) and with artists Dan Welden, Carol Wax, Walter Feldman, and Daniel Heyma. She has taught printmaking classes at the Providence Art Club since 2003. Her art can be found in numerous private and public collections including: the Smithsonian; Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum; National Museum of Women in the Arts; United States Library of Congress; New Britain Museum of American Art; Civic Collection of Schio, Italy; Federal Reserve Board Fine Arts Collection; Newport Art Museum and others. Her work has been featured in The Best of Printmaking, An International Collection (1997), The Artists’ Magazine (2003), 100 Artists of New England (2011) and the Journal of the Print Worlds (2012, 2013). Listed in the Biographical Encyclopedia of American Painters, Sculptors & Engravers of the U.S., Colonial to 2002 and Who's Who in American Art since 1991. Carol was honored in 2012 with the Providence Art Club Medal and again in 2016 when her silhouette was added to the collection painted on the club walls, a tradition begun in 1887.

fitzsimjc@cox.net

Printmaker, Book Artist, Instructor and former commercial Gallery Curator, Carol has exhibited her work at colleges.

A graduate of Hollins College with a degree in Art, she has continued study with classes/workshops from Olympc College (WA)

Carol was honored in 2012 with the Providence Art Club Medal and again in 2016 when her silhouette was added to the collection painted on the club walls, a tradition begun in 1887.

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List of Artwork jpegs:

  1. ARTiculation, Coptic Artist Book with clamshell box, aquatints with embossing and chine colle’, 2018
  2. ARTiculation texture, Concertina Artist Book with clamshell box, collagraphs, 2018
  3. ARTiculation shape, Accordion Artist Book with clamshell box, aquatints with embossing and chine colle’, 2018
  4. Floral Patterns, Star Accordion Artist Book, mixed media drypoint, 2017
  5. Head in the Clouds, Coptic Artist Book, Aquatint, 2017
www.csfitzsimonds.com

fitzsimjc@cox.net

Printmaker, Book Artist, Instructor and former commercial Gallery Curator, Carol has exhibited her work at colleges, museums, and galleries across the United States and abroad. A graduate of Hollins College with a degree in Art, she has continued study with classes/workshops from Olympc College (WA), Art League School (VA) and with artists Dan Welden, Carol Wax, Walter Feldman, and Daniel Heyma. She has taught printmaking classes at the Providence Art Club since 2003. Her art can be found in numerous private and public collections including: the Smithsonian; Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum; National Museum of Women in the Arts; United States Library of Congress; New Britain Museum of American Art; Civic Collection of Schio, Italy; Federal Reserve Board Fine Arts Collection; Newport Art Museum and others. Her work has been featured in The Best of Printmaking, An International Collection (1997), The Artists’ Magazine (2003), 100 Artists of New England (2011) and the Journal of the Print Worlds (2012, 2013). Listed in the Biographical Encyclopedia of American Painters, Sculptors & Engravers of the U.S., Colonial to 2002 and Who's Who in American Art since 1991. Carol was honored in 2012 with the Providence Art Club Medal and again in 2016 when her silhouette was added to the collection painted on the club walls, a tradition begun in 1887.